Wednesday, September 24, 2014

#FOAMed Digest No.5: But This One Goes to 11

Time once again for your mid-week blast of FOAMy goodness from around the interwebs. There’s no particular subject today; instead we’re going to highlight some of the better podcasts/vodcasts that updated this week. Podcasts are great. They break up the monotony of reading (and the monotony of mundane things like laundry, grocery shopping, training for this damn marathon…). For the more distractible among us, they usually come in easily-digestible 20-30 minute morsels. They expose you to different presentation styles, and allow you to match a face and a voice with the big names in FOAMed. Most of them also feature written show notes with references as well, which allows you both to reinforce the things you learned while listening, and also to dig deeper into topics you’re interested in.

Fun for the whole family!

Three Stars:

1. I think FOAMcast, authored by residents and EM social media savants Jeremy Faust and Lauren Westafer, might be the first example of “metaFOAM.” They peruse the FOAM world for interesting recent posts, then integrate that information with relevant material from the most popular EM textbooks (i.e., “Rosenalli”), other relevant blogs/podcasts, primary literature, and even Rosh Review questions. This week they use a post from ALiEM on calcium channel blockers vs beta blockers for A-Fib as a jumping-off point for a discussion on ED management of A-Fib and A-Flutter. There’s links to vodcasts from Scott Weingart and Amal Mattu on narrow-complex tachydysrhythmias, and plenty of cited references from the primary literature (including one from our own Brian Cohn!). It’s good stuff.

2. Speaking of the Godfather of ED EKG, Dr. Mattu has two quick cases for you to ponder. Remember: T-wave inversion does not always mean cardiac ischemia!
Remember: Gotta think tox in a seemingly unprovoked wide complex tachycardia!

3. Steve Carroll at EM Basic provides an excellent analysis of the ED management of asymptomatic hypertension, including references to the relevant ACEP Clinical Policy document and other FOAMed resources.

Oldie But Goodie:

Chris Nickson, creator and administrator of Life in the Fast Lane, gave an excellent talk at the original SMACC conference in March 2013 with the confidence-inspiring title, “All Doctors are Jackasses.” Why are we jackasses? Because we don’t do enough to understand how we think and how we make decisions, and this leads us to make errors. Watch Nickson’s lecture and begin to understand how to remedy this situation.
(EXTRA CREDIT: Links in the show notes to the other SMACC talks in the “Mind of the Resuscitationist” plenary by Weingart, Cliff Reid, and Simon Carley.)


By this point you guys all know how awesome EM:RAP is, but this week is particularly relevant because Herbert & Co. just released an “EM:RAP Mini” segment about the newly-published “Ultrasonography versus Computed Tomography for Suspected Nephrolithiasis” trial in the New England Journal. For those of you that aren’t familiar, this was a study in which we participated, and our own Drs. Aubin and Griffey are authors on the paper! An excellent summary of this paper is found on the Emergency Medicine Ireland blog, with a link to download the EM:RAP Mini segment in the show notes.

The Gunner Files:

1. Time to synthesize the knowledge you gained about non-surgical management of pediatric appendicitis at Journal Club last month. Dr. Cohn is back with another excellent EMJClub podcast along with Drs. Trehan and Horst, summarizing the primary literature.

2. EMin5 is back at it with a review of the four types of shock, in a little over four minutes.

3. From the Maryland Critical Care Project, an excellent lecture from Neuro Critical Care and ED intensivist Dr. Wendy Chang describing the ED management of status epilepticus. She covers the gamut from first-line benzos to second-line AEDs and third-line agents for initiation of therapeutic coma.

4. The good people at the All NYC EM blog posted a lecture given during their conference day by the FOAMed superstar Dr. Haney Mallemat. He covers all the basics of ultrasound evaluation of pericardial effusion and tamponade, even ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis.

5. In case you’re not familiar, US Air Force Pararescuemen, a.k.a. “PJs,” are the ultimate badasses. Just look at it this way: think becoming a SEAL is tough? PJ training has an even higher failure rate. But I digress.
Former PJ and critical care flight retrieval medic Mike Lauria is now in medical school, and is making a bit of a splash in the FOAMed community as an expert on training, thinking, and operating in high-stress environments. Scott Weingart recently interviewed him on EMCrit about the concept of “mental toughness,” how that translates from the combat realm to the ED, and how to incorporate it into physician training. Really interesting stuff.

That Others May Live,

Sam Smith, PGY-3

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